Comforting Hands

Cancer Caregiver Counseling

“Caregiving often calls us to lean into love we didn’t know possible.” – Tia Walker

Caring for

the Caregiver 

Being told "you have cancer" is one of the hardest things a person will ever experience. However, being told "You your mother/father, husband/wife, child, friend, etc. has cancer" is also one of the most terrifying things a person can hear. 

“There are only four kinds of people in the world: Those who have been caregivers. Those who are currently caregivers. Those who will be caregivers, and those who will need a caregiver.”

– Rosalyn Carter

If your loved one is one of the estimated 1.8 million people who are diagnosed with cancer each year, that makes you one of the 1.8 million people whose lives are also changed by cancer, as you've shifted your role and responsibility from being simply daughter, wife, mother, friend, to . . . caregiver. 

There are few things in this world more painful than watching the people we love suffer. 

Not sure if caregiver counseling is something you need?

Ask yourself the following questions: 

  • Do I know my rights as a caregiver?

  • Do I know what to do during meetings with the Oncologist?

  • Do I know what my loved one will experience during and after chemotherapy/radiation appointments?

  • Do I know methods to keep track of medications?

  • Do I know when and who to call in case my loved one experiences severe side effects?

  • Do I know how to work with insurance companies, inform employers, and keep track of financials for both myself and my loved one during this time?

  • Do I know if I need a medical power of attorney

  • Do I want to know the chances for my loved ones survival? 

  • Do I know how to have difficult conversations with my loved one?

  • Do I know my loved ones wishes in the event they pass away?

  • Do I know how to recognize signs of mental health distress in myself or my loved one? 

  • Do I know what anticipatory grief is and how to manage it?

  • Do I have coping skills do deal with chronic stress?

  • Do I know how to maintain a self care routine while continuing to care for my loved one?

  • Do I need someone to share my honest emotions and fears with?

  • Do I have trouble seeing positivity or finding meaning in this experience?

Women in White
Woman & Doctor

Nothing about this new role and period of life will be easy. The knowledge that someone you love has a potentially terminal illness can evoke intense anxiety, depression, symptoms of anticipatory grief, chronic stress, and even vicarious trauma. The important thing to remember is this: 1. You do not need to go through this alone. 2. There is a way to get through this positively 3. You are so much stronger than you realize. 

As a former cancer caregiver, I've been in your shoes. I know from first hand experience how incredibly difficult it is to face the loss of someone you love and completely interrupt your life and routine to take on caregiving duties.  It can be overwhelming to figure out where to start, how to deal with insurance companies, what role you play in medical appointments, how to talk to your loved one about their wishes . . . the list goes on! 

If you answered "yes" to any of these questions, I can help. I've been there and I can help you through every step of the process.

Are you ready to get the support you need in order to give the best support possible to your ill loved one?

Let's get started . . . 

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